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Fist Look at KITH x Nike LeBron 15 ‘Long Live the King’ Released 2018 All-Star

Le 24 mars 2018, 07:27 dans Humeurs 0

Kith is opening up their Los Angeles flagship store during All-Star Weekend and to celebrate they are releasing the Kith x Nike LeBron 15 ‘Long Live the King’ Chapter 2 Collection.

Included in the collection is four different Nike LeBron 15 releases which two land in the performance line while the other two represents lifestyle. For performance we have King’s Cloak’ and ‘Suit of Armor’ while the lifestyle features the ‘King’s Crown’ and ‘City of Angels’. Each pair is constructed with Primeknit across the uppers with unique embroidered detailing, zippers and straps.

At the Kith x Nike LeBron 15 Long Live the King Black Gold This Nike LeBron 15 comes in predominate Black while the straps reads ‘Long Live The King’ done in Gold. In addition we have floral and unique designed embroidered throughout done in Gold and Red. Finishing the look is a Matte Black on the outsole.

at the KITH x Nike LeBron 15 ‘Rose Pink’ ,This first look comes from LeBron James’ friend Frankie Walker. Looking closer at this Nike LeBron 15 they feature Rose Pink across the uppers while Rose Gold is applied to the zipper. When its unzipped you can see the tongue comes in White while constructed with leather. Also displayed is ‘KITH x Nike LeBron 15’ and ‘Long Live The King’. Finishing the look is a translucent outsole.

at the KITH x Nike LeBron 15 Floral As you can see, this Nike LeBron 15 features White across the base however the highlight would be the Floral embroidery seen wrapping the uppers. Following we have Gold on the lace tips and White on the rubber outsole. The LeBron 15 is constructed with BattleKnit and BattleMax technology.

The Kith x Nike LeBron Long Live the King Chapter 2 Collection will first release this Friday, February 16th

Nike Air Max 95: The Story Behind the Revolutionary Runner

Le 23 mars 2018, 12:14 dans Humeurs 0

It’s been 20 years since Nike first debuted the classic Air Max 95, which marked a big shift in the performance running sneaker market at the time. With its distinct rippled design across its upper, gradient gray color scheme, and bright neon yellow accents, the original model was a bold, provocative silhouette that had not been preceded by any sneaker before its time. Nike brought on board Nike ACG designer Sergio Lozano to spearhead the project, a trained industrial designer whose four-year experience with tennis and training shoes would bring a fresh perspective to the Air Max family.

The ’90s Sneaker Market

In the early ’90s Nike Basketball was dominating the sneaker market, with the popularity of basketball shoes gaining traction well ahead of runners. Lozano positioned the revolutionary Air Max 95 project as a means to recapture the public’s attention towards the performance running category.

New Color, New Swoosh

Lozano wanted to minimize the appearance of dirt, mud, and wear-and-tear that the shoe would achieve over time and use, so he prioritized the use of the gradient gray even when told that the colorway would not sell. The signature neon yellow shade too is a direct nod towards Nike’s race kit that continues to incorporate bright colors. This neon “Volt” colorway has since become a heritage-defining Nike color theme that is consistently reissued for other silhouettes.

The first 95 prototype didn’t have the Swoosh logo at all. Eventually it came to incorporate the minimal branding as a small accent, with an unconventional placement that could not distract attention from the undulating lines of the upper. Lozano told Sneaker Freaker, “from the design to the color to the little Swoosh, it all caused controversy. I had initially designed the shoe without a Swoosh because we believed the design was aesthetically strong… so we positioned it as a signature, a sign off on the shoe for jordans for all .”



The 95 was a brand new approach to runner cushioning by being the first-ever shoe to also feature the visible Air unit in the forefoot. It was also the first Air Max model to have a black midsole. Despite these innovations, the Air Max 95 was considered an outcast. Even the advertising was quite unconventional for Nike – check out this retro commercial advertising the bold atmos x Nike Air Max 95 2006 Supreme “Animal” silhouette that was made in collaboration with the Tokyo-based streetwear boutique.

With its unique colorway, Swoosh placement, and dual air-powered cushioning system, the unapologetically brash Air Max 95 quickly progressed into a youth culture icon. This was especially so throughout Europe and Australia. A smaller following in America includes much of the hip-hop community, with artists like Gucci Mane and Danny Brown having dropped bars about the sneaker. “I’ll kill you if you try me for my Air Max 95s,” rapped The Game in “Hate It Or Love It” (2005) as a direct reference to the Bloods adopting the Air Max 95 as their signature shoe, while the Crips had the Air Max 98s. Other fans of the beloved sneaker include 2 Chainz, Big Boi, Eminem, The Game, Busta Rhymes, DJ Khaled, Nelly, T.I., T-Pain, Wale, Spike Lee, LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Floyd Mayweather, Jr., and J.R. Smith.

Notable Colorways and Collaborations

Though not the most often reiterated Nike model, the Air Max 95 has seen its share of vibrant colorways and modern collaborations, especially so throughout the 2000s. Colorways like the Air Max 95 “Black Grape” and the Air Max 95 Pure White/Black exhibit cleaner iterations of the sneaker, while special models like the NFL x Nike Air Max 95 “NFC East” Pack and the Air Max 95 “Country Camo” Japan exemplify the silhouette’s versatility in adopting bold themes.

The Air Max 95 Legacy

“The Air Max 95’s greatest strength, its individuality, was also its greatest hurdle,” Nike’s website states. As the first of its kind, the model considerably paved the way for other forthcoming silhouettes of similarly ostentatious designs, such as the Air Max Plus — known on the street and overseas as the Tuned 1 or TNs — that released in 1998. The subsequent Air Max 97 was also another iteration of the wavy-lined upper. In celebration of its 20th anniversary, Nike will be releasing the original model in its original box along with two new Air Max 95s: the Air Max 95 White Red, designed by Air Max Ultra and Roshe One designer Dylan Raasch, and the Air Max 95 Ultra “Jacquard,” designed by Ben Yun. The Ultra “Jacquard” will be launched in the classic neon “Volt” as well as other colorways like Total Orange, Stealth Black, White/Grey and White/Blue. The new releases drop July 16.

Air Jordan 3 White Cement - 2003 vs. 2011 vs. 2018 Comparison

Le 22 mars 2018, 12:24 dans Humeurs 0

One of the handful of sneakers often singled out as the most beloved in the Air Jordan line, the "White Cement" Air Jordan 3 makes a triumphant return to retail this month. This time around, the retro carries OG designation, meaning 'Nike Air' branding will be featured on the heel for the first time since the first re-release in 2011. A lot of things have changed since Tinker Hatfield's creation first hit the market more than 30 years ago, but the Jordan 3 will once again rule All-Star Weekend.

Last week’s Air Jordan III White/Cement Grey release marked the fourth overall release of the shoe; before 2018 was a Retro release in 2011 and 2003, and of course, the original debut in 1988. With the 2011 version arriving with a great Jordan box inspired by the original, an Air Jordan III retrospective might’ve ran through your thoughts once or twice. Here’s a look back at the Original 1988, 1994 Retro, and 2011  and 2018 Retro box packaging of the White/Cement III; the original version, in which the 2011 version was modeled after, featured a black box-top with a red Jumpman and Nike Air insignia, while the 2011 version features a Jumpman and Jumpman Air logo (for obvious reasons). So what’s the deal with the 1994 box? If you remember, 1994 was Michael Jordan’s first full year of retirement, and Nike was planning ahead on keeping the Air Jordan Legacy alive after he was no longer an active player, and re-issuing classic Air Jordans was one way to rekindle the fire. The box itself is a mosiac of all the Air Jordans up to that date, depicting the Air Jordan models from years before as well as Spike Lee and the popular Air Jordan III ad campaigns in which he was a part of.

the air jordan 3 white cement 2018 In the final round of the 1988 Slam Dunk Contest, MJ raced from the opposite end of the court, planted his left foot on the stripe and launched himself toward the rim. As he drew the ball back toward his shoulder, the audience held its breath and the cameras flashed from every angle. It was a gravity-defying, time-bending, immortal dunk. The judges awarded it a perfect 50, sealing the contest for MJ.Down below, a Red stripe cuts across the translucent outsole to mark the spot where MJ left Earth and made history.

The latest Air Jordan 3 arrives in the colors of its 1988 debut – the same worn by MJ during that extraordinary flight. It includes the original Nike Air branding on the back. Down below, a red stripe cuts across the translucent outsole to mark the spot where MJ left Earth and made history.


In addition to comparing the previous boxes is a nice side-by-side between the Air Jordan III from 1994 and 2011 and 2018. The ’94 version was the last of its colorway to feature Nike Air on the heel (the 2003 version featured a Jumpman and was housed in a plain Jordan Brand box), but the branding issue isn’t the only discrepancy; the upper dimensions have been slightly altered over the years, although noticeable only when juxtaposed (how often will that really happen?). There are a lot more comparison shots below so check give them a quick look and let us know what you think. A big thank you to the Kicktionary team for sending these great shots, and if you still haven’t picked up a pair of the White/Cement IIIs yet, grab a pair now on

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